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Feb
18

Seniors & How to Prevent Falls

Seniors & How to Prevent Falls One of the greatest areas of concern impacting seniors' safety and independence is falling. As strength, mobility and balance change with age, the elderly population becomes more vulnerable to falls. In fact, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) identifies falls as the number one cause of senior injury ...
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17 Hits
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Jan
22

Why Oral Health Matters for Seniors

Taking care of your teeth is important at any age. Brushing, flossing and seeing your dentist regularly are tasks we have to perform throughout our lives. This daily ritual is still important no matter how old we get. For older Americans, continuing to care for their mouths, teeth and gums can have a significant effect on their overall health. A he...
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60 Hits
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Oct
08

Breast Cancer Risks & Warning Signs for Seniors

In recent years, the prevalence of the color pink during October has become a nationwide symbol of the fight to end breast cancer. In the 1950s, the NY Times refused to print an ad for a breast cancer support group. They did not want to print the words, "breast" or "cancer". The fight to bring this disease into the spotlight has made huge strides s...
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230 Hits
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Apr
04

Important Health Screenings for Seniors

The U.S. Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) is a volunteer panel comprised of national experts in the fields of evidence-based medicine and disease prevention. The organization is an independent unit that works to improve Americans' health by making recommendations for clinical preventative services. As we age, and the list of potential comp...
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465 Hits
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Feb
03

Staying Healthy through Winter

Staying Healthy through Winter

The thought of spring is blossoming in our minds. As we long for the first warm day of the season, where we can crack open our windows and put our winter coats back in the closet, it’s important to remember that it’s not yet time to stop worrying about germs and to what they may lead. While the seasonal influenza viruses begin to spike in December, and the flu seasons can vary in length and severity each year, February is most often the peak month of flu activity. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, since 1983 the highest percentages of respiratory specimens that have tested positive influenza have occurred in February. Even though it is tempting to daydream about warmer and healthier days, it’s very important to keep up with the oldest rule in the “book of hygiene”: wash up!

 

A little soap and water can go a long way in preventing diarrheal and respiratory illnesses that are easily spread by human contact. A thorough wet, lather, scrub, rinse, and dry, are five very important steps that can make a big difference in reducing the spread of these viruses, especially if you are caring for a senior with a weakened immune system. Most of us are familiar with the ritual before we eat, after we sneeze or cough, and after using or touching the toilet, but it’s important to use good judgment and wash thoroughly after handling anything that involves food, waste, animals or open wounds. If soap and water is not available, try to use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer as a replacement until water and soap are available. While alcohol-based hand rubs can be efficient, there is nothing quite like warm water and some suds. Washing away germs is a small habit that makes a big difference in keeping germs at bay.

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